Ottawa River Coalition | Wildlife | Ottawa River Coalition
The Ottawa River is an important natural resource that supports a vast array of wildlife, not just in the river, but on the ground and in the sky as well.
Ottawa River Coalition, wildlife, animals, birds, insects, mammals, reptiles, amphibians
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Wildlife

The Ottawa River

Teeming with Life

The Ottawa River is an important natural resource that supports a vast array of wildlife, not just in the river, but on the ground and in the sky as well. As you travel along the Riverwalk, keep your eyes peeled for the fish, birds, reptiles, amphibians, insects and mammals that call the river home, from the urban area around downtown Lima to the lush farmland. As the quality of water continues to improve, we will see an even greater variety of wildlife along our Ottawa River.

This photo is a closeup of the Ottawa River at Lovers Lane/Lima Stadium Lowhead Dam. I tried to capture both the universal and the individual character of the Ottawa river. Flowing water is very familiar to us. On the other hand, a river is a very dynamic environment. It changes all the time. (June 2018) Photo Credit: Volker Jeschonnek (Tri-Moraine Audubon Society) / ORC

The Ottawa River bends at Schoonover Park in Lima. The clearing of the banks in the spring allowed a better look. (April 2018) Photo Credit: Volker Jeschonnek (Tri-Moraine Audubon Society) / ORC

A male brown-headed cowbird perches on the bank of the Ottawa River at Schoonover Park in Lima. Cowbirds are frequent guests at the river and often let humans get closer than other birds. (May 2018) Photo Credit: Volker Jeschonnek (Tri-Moraine Audubon Society) / ORC

A groundhog, woodchuck is another name, sticks its head out of its burrow on the bank of the Ottawa River near Pine Street bridge. In spring, it is delightful to see young groundhogs at play. Photo Credit: Volker Jeschonnek (Tri-Moraine Audubon Society) / ORC

Flowering trees make a stroll along the river more interesting in spring. This tree, at Schoonover Park, is possibly a crabapple tree. (April 2016) Photo Credit: Volker Jeschonnek (Tri-Moraine Audubon Society) / ORC

Where there are trees on the banks of the Ottawa River, there are squirrels. This squirrel enjoys the sunshine near Pine Street bridge. (April 2016) Photo Credit: Volker Jeschonnek (Tri-Moraine Audubon Society) / ORC

This male American Goldfinch is ready for a meal. The thorns of teasels do not stop them from getting at the food inside. The photo was taken between Schoonover Park and the railroad bridge. (April 2016) Photo Credit: Volker Jeschonnek (Tri-Moraine Audubon Society) / ORC

The Ottawa River changes with the seasons. In spring, when the leaves of bushes and trees are just emerging the views are among the best. This photo was taken at the railroad bridge near Schoonover Park. (May 2016) Photo Credit: Volker Jeschonnek (Tri-Moraine Audubon Society) / ORC

American robins are year-round residents at the Ottawa River where they also build nests and raise their young. The photo was taken close to the railroad bridge near Schoonover Park. (April 2016) Photo Credit: Volker Jeschonnek (Tri-Moraine Audubon Society) / ORC

Turkey vultures are social birds. These four take a break on one of the “islands” of the Ottawa River between Bellefontaine Street and Pine Street. (May 2016) Photo Credit: Sabine Jeschonnek / ORC

Mallard families are quite large, and the Ottawa River is a good place for the parents to raise their “kids.” The photo was taken at the Bellefontaine Street bridge. (May 2016) Photo Credit: Volker Jeschonnek (Tri-Moraine Audubon Society) / ORC

When one is lucky, one will see a great egret at the Ottawa River. This photo was taken at Lovers Lane/Lima Stadium Lowhead Dam. These birds are members of the heron family. (October 2016) PhotoCredit: Volker Jeschonnek (Tri-Moraine Audubon Society) / ORC

Common buckeye butterflies actually arrive only in late summer in South Ohio. Expect to see them here in early fall, for example at Schoonover Park. (September 2016) Photo Credit: Volker Jeschonnek (Tri-Moraine Audubon Society) / ORC

Hedge bindweed is common on the banks of the Ottawa River and its flowers are pretty. Unfortunately, it is a noxious weed that can overwhelm other more desirable plants. (September 2016) Photo Credit: Volker Jeschonnek (Tri-Moraine Audubon Society) / ORC

A cabbage white butterfly sits on a cutleaf coneflower between the High Street and Bellefontaine Street bridges. Early fall is a good time to see butterflies. (September 2016) Photo Credit: Volker Jeschonnek (Tri-Moraine Audubon Society) / ORC

Three Canada geese approach the bend of the Ottawa River at Schoonover Park. Canada geese are year-round residents at the river and breed there. (April 2018) Photo Credit: Volker Jeschonnek (Tri-Moraine Audubon Society) / ORC